Blog Archives

Invest in Healthy Ecosystems

With the global population set to reach 7 billion people later this year food and resource security is becoming increasingly more important. This week a new report from the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and its partners announced that investing in healthy ecosystems could improve food security, enhance resilience to climate change, as well as provide economic benefits for poor communities.

The report, which was written by over 50 contributors, uses case studies of China, Guatemala, Jordan as well as others to present the issues as well as recommend changes. The three specific areas of change in order to improve food security and reduce stresses on water supplies are detailed as: environmental protection, water resources management and food production. The report also explains that one of the most difficult challenges in improving current levels of food production is the availability of water because it is needed for livestock, crop irrigation, fisheries and other agricultural uses. Likewise, the report also makes recommendations for drylands, wetlands, crop systems, fisheries and livestock systems.


“Maintaining healthy, resilient ecosystems to ensure water availability for agriculture and other ecosystem services is thus essential for long-term food security,” a press release on the report produced by UNEP and the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) stated.

Investing in our healthy ecosystems could make huge differences in the everyday and long-term lives of communities around the globe. You can also get involved in a variety of ways, both small and big, through WhyHunger.com – a organization building a movement to end hunger and poverty by connecting people to nutritious, affordable food and by supporting grassroots solutions. Likewise you can read more about the global food crisis and what the UN is doing to help here.

Here at UNA-GB we will be holding a Women’s Forum Luncheon Roundtable on October 6th, which will focus on Women, Population, and the Millennium Development Goals.  Jane Roberts, a grassroots advocate who is the co-founder of the 34 Million Friends of the UNFPA project will share how supporting gender equality makes a positive impact on all of the MDGs and population issues as a whole. Her contributions in the fields of population, development, the environment, and the human rights of women and girls have led to many recognitions, including a feature chapter in Nicholas Kristof’s NY Times bestseller Half the SkyRSVP now to get involved and join the conversation!

– Alexandra

9th Annual Global Film Festival kicks off this weekend!

You’re invited!  If you’ve been looking for powerful, international documentaries depicting some of the very critical issues of the world, now is the time to buy your tickets for the films screening on September 24-25, and October 1-2, 2010.

On the first weekend (September 24 and 25), Friday night we’ll have two films: Sutura, a film about how women in Senegal are organizing to end the silence around rape and sexual violence in their communities; and Democracy in Dakar, a groundbreaking documentary bridging the gap between hip-hop activism, video journalism and documentary film focusing on politics in Dakar Senegal. This film explores the role of youth and musical activism on the political process following rappers, DJs, journalists, professors and people on the street at the time before during and after the controversial 2007 presidential election in Senegal.

Saturday evening’s film is Little Town of Bethlehem, which follows the story of three men of three different faiths, their lives in Israel and Palestine, and each man’s choice of non-violent action amidst a culture of overwhelming violence. The film examines the struggle to promote equality through non-violent engagement in the midst of incredible violence that has dehumanized all sides.

On the second weekend (October 1 and 2), Friday night’s film is Countdown to Zero which will sweep us into a scorching, hypnotic journey around the world to reveal the palpable possibility of nuclear disaster and frame an issue on which human survival itself hangs. 

On Saturday, we are fortunate to have a Sneak Peek of Cape Wind about the divisive controversy over the Cape Wind project, which will be replicated hundreds of times over as industrial-scale renewable energy projects are proposed for America’s deserts, ridge lines, and waterways.

After each film, filmmakers and/or experts will join us for a panel discussion, giving you a chance to discuss your viewpoints.

All films will screen at 7pm at the Harvard Kennedy School.  See our website at www.bostonfilms.org for film descriptions, schedule, venue, and ticket information.

Seating is limited, so purchasing your tickets as soon as possible is highly recommended.

Cheers,

Stephanie Sanchez
Film Festival Coordinator