Blog Archives

A Youthful Week: Week of 7/25 News Roundup

A lot of focus was on the global leaders of our future throughout this week as the week started with the UN high-level meeting dedicated to the development of youth. The theme of the meeting was “Youth: Dialogue and Mutual Understanding”, just in time as the International Year of Youth is coming to an end this summer.

Along with the topic of youth, came a new report released by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) at a side event of the UN high-level meeting, the report titled “Securing the Future Today“. This report and discussion focused on the youth’s actions to fight against the disease of AIDS. This will be a step in the right direction for our future, and the future goals in the UN’s Millennium Development Goals as goal #6 focuses on the global fight against the disease, HIV/AIDS, and other diseases including malaria.

Disease was also a big topic this week, as millions of children received the measles vaccination in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The UN World Health Organization helped in coordinating this great achievement, as there has been a measles epidemic that many people have lost their lives to and the funding was needed to make this event a great success. In efforts to globally fight against more diseases, the UN marked July 27th World Hepatitis Day as a day to recognize the fight and prevention of the disease. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation with the soccer team FC Barcelona have joined this week in the fight against disease to create a campaign against polio, called “More than a Goal. End Polio”. With a said 1 percent left in the fight against the disease and its eradication, the organizations are determined to put an end to it.

Along with disease, comes the support of resources and nutrition throughout the world so that people can survive with access to basic needs and children can develop and prosper. The crisis in the Horn of Africa continued this week as the drought is causing a lack of water and therefore threat of nutrition to people throughout the continent’s nations. More support is needed, as there are also many children suffering from this crisis, causing malnutrition and this threatening their survival in the crisis for all, with a said $1.4 billion in funding appealed by the UN to support the cause.

Efforts continue to assist globally in the fights against disease, malnutrition, resources and overall the availability of safe living conditions around the world. Support and funding is needed to continue to allow for these wonderful projects to develop and you can get involved in the action! In time for August 2nd, you can contact Congress representatives to share your voice towards the budget cuts that will unfortunately help support programs like these, specifically programs that help support women and girls throughout the world have availability to resources.

Join in the support and action to help the people of today in any way you can and the global leaders of tomorrow in our youth today!

-Cara

Come out to celebrate World Health Day today!

Calling all Bostonians! Come commemorate World Health Day, as the World Health Organization in partnership with Tufts University School of Medicine and UNA-GB present: Guinea Worm Disease: The Impending Eradication World Health Day Celebration. The event which will be held from 12pm-2pm today at the Jaharis Behrakis will feature a keynote address by Dr. Albis Francesco Gabrielli of the World Health Organization and also additional speakers from Tufts University, Rotary International and the Carter Center.  

According to the Carter Center “Guinea worm disease is set to become the second disease in human history, after smallpox, to be eradicated. It will be the first parasitic disease to be eradicated and the first disease to be eradicated without the use of a vaccine or medical treatment.”

Guinea Worm Disease is a debilitating infection that has plagued people of Asian, African and Middle Eastern nations since the early 1900’s. Its widespread reach is largely in part to contaminated drinking water and lack of education in rural communities. Often the disease is so painful that afflicted individuals are unable to work or provide for their families for extended periods of time.

Today we celebrate that thanks to a concentrated effort by partners worldwide and also the countries themselves, the disease has been reduced by over 99 percent! This drastic reduction has been made possible through interception of the disease by educational programs teaching communities about clean water and simple prevention methods such as how sieve water through cloth before drinking. Speakers during the event will address these methods as well as the worldwide public health implications of the eradication of this disease.

Today’s event will also recognize that although the world has taken great strides toward eradication this disease still continues to affect individuals in 6 African countries. Which is why political and organizational support for eradication programs and the individuals who execute them is important now more than ever. Without their enormous dedication and attention to detail gaining both the understanding and cooperation of the remaining affected communities will not be possible.

Please join us on the Tufts campus or watch the live online broadcast and show your support for the future of World Health!

-Katie